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Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

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Fostering Success for Georgia’s Foster Care Youth Through the Fostering Success Act, Georgia taxpayers have an impactful opportunity to give a hand up to youth aging out of the state’s foster care system.

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. Of those who age out and leave the state’s foster care system:

Our goal is to significantly improve these statistics by changing the narrative for these overlooked and underserved young people. 

The Fostering Success Act will generate up to $20 million per year to support un-adopted youth making the transition into adulthood.

Eighty percent of this funding will be distributed directly through qualified nonprofit organizations directly to young people actively enrolled in college or vocational training. And it will cover everything from tuition and books to food, housing, transportation, healthcare, and other basic needs.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Foster Care Youth

Through the Fostering Success Act, Georgia taxpayers have an impactful opportunity to give a hand up to youth aging out of the state’s foster care system.

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. Of those who age out and leave the state’s foster care system:

37%

will experience
homelessness

87%

of boys will spend time in jail

71%

of girls will become
pregnant within one year

97%

without a stable support
system will wind up in
chronic poverty or worse

Our goal is to significantly improve these statistics by changing the narrative for these overlooked and underserved young people.

The Fostering Success Act will generate up to $20 million per year to support un-adopted youth making the transition into adulthood. Eighty percent of this funding will be distributed directly through qualified nonprofit organizations directly to young people actively enrolled in college or vocational training. And it will cover everything from tuition and books to food, housing, transportation, healthcare, and other basic needs.

Beginning January 1, 2023, Georgia tax filers can apply to receive 100 percent tax credit for donations made to qualified foster support organizations.

%

Eighty percent of this funding will be distributed directly through qualified nonprofit organizations directly to young people actively enrolled in college or vocational training. And it will cover everything from tuition and books to food, housing, transportation, healthcare, and other basic needs.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

37%

will experience
homelessness

87%

Of boys will spend time in jail

71%

of girls will become
pregnant within one year

97%

without a stable support
system will wind up in
chronic poverty or worse

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

%

Eighty percent of this funding will be distributed directly through qualified nonprofit organizations directly to young people actively enrolled in college or vocational training. And it will cover everything from tuition and books to food, housing, transportation, healthcare, and other basic needs.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Fostering Success for Georgia’s Former Foster Youth

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

Beginning January 1, 2023, Georgia tax filers can apply to receive 100 percent tax credit for donations made to qualified foster support organizations.

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82%

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

28%

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

36%

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

93%

On average, 700 young people age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year. It is estimated that more than 9,000 youth have emancipated from Georgia’s foster care since 1998.

About the Fostering Success Act

In 2022, the Georgia Legislature unanimously passed House Bill 424, known as the “Fostering Success Act.” This established a Qualified Foster Child Donation Credit Program which funds wrap-around services for aged-out foster youth by offering tax filers a dollar-for-dollar tax credit for donations made to Qualified Foster Child Support Organizations.

700 Each Year

This initiative is a game-changer for the 700 young people who age out of Georgia’s foster care system each year.

20 Million

Capped at $20 million annually, these funds will directly provide essential support to un-adopted youth through support with education, housing, counseling, medical, and transportation services.

Our Purpose

The purpose of this website is to educate Georgia tax filers on the Fostering Success Act and assist them in taking advantage of this tax credit to directly support our state’s foster youth.

About the Fostering Success Act

In 2022, the Georgia Legislature unanimously passed House Bill 424, known as the “Fostering Success Act.” This established a Qualified Foster Child Donation Credit Program which funds wrap-around services for aged-out foster youth by offering tax filers a dollar-for-dollar tax credit for donations made to Qualified Foster Child Support Organizations.

House Bill 424

Signed by Governor Brian Kemp on May 9, 2022, and effective on July 1, 2022, the Fostering Success Act awards Georgia income tax credits to individual and corporate taxpayers who donate to a Qualified Foster Child Support Organization.

The following summarizes key definitions, deliverables, and deadlines contained within House Bill 424, as passed in the House and Senate:

  • Aging Foster Children are defined as foster children aged 16 through 18, and former foster children up to 25 years of age, who have not been adopted or reunited with families
  • Foster Child Support Organizations include:
    o   The aging-out program of either the Technical College System of Georgia Foundation or University System of Georgia Foundation
    o   Any domestic 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that has the primary function of operating an aging-out program or operating/supporting a Georgia licensed child-placement agency
  • Qualified Contributions means the pre-approved contribution of funds made during the taxable year by a taxpayer to a Qualified Organization under the terms and conditions of the Fostering Success Act
  • Qualified Expenditures include:
    o   Costs associated with tuition waivers
    o   Wraparound services for individuals attending a public postsecondary education institution under a waiver
    o   Mentorship services provided to aging foster children, provided no mentor shall be compensated in excess of $100 per month for an aging out foster child or $500 per year for any aging out foster child
  • Qualified Organization means a foster child support organization that has been certified and listed on the Georgia Department of Revenue’s website
  • Wraparound Services means services provided directly to aging foster children to support their education through postsecondary education services, housing services, vocation services, medical services, counseling services, mentorship services, nutrition services, transportation services, or up to $100 per month in direct cash payments for use on personal necessities
  • The aggregate amount of tax credits allowed under this Code shall not exceed $20 million per calendar year
  • The Georgia Department of Revenue shall maintain a web-based application process for the purpose of certifying Foster Child Support Organizations as qualified organizations
  • Prior to making a contribution to a qualified organization, the taxpayer shall electronically notify the Georgia Department of Revenue of the total amount of contribution such taxpayer intends to make to a Qualified Organization
    o   Within 30 days of receiving a taxpayer’s request, the commissioner shall preapprove, deny, or prorate requested amounts on a first come, first serve basis based on the availability of the tax credits
    o   Within 60 days after receiving the preapproval notice, the taxpayer shall contribute the preapproved amount to the Qualified Organization, or the preapproval will expire
  • Each Qualified Organization shall issue a letter of confirmation to each contributor, to include the taxpayer’s name, address, tax ID number, date and amount of contribution, and the total amount of the credit allowed
  • To claim the tax credit, the taxpayer should attach all letters to their tax return
  • No later than May 15 of each year, each Qualified Organization shall submit:
    o   A complete copy of its IRS Form 990 to the Georgia Department of Revenue
    o   A report detailing the contributions received during the calendar year
  • By April 1 each year, each Qualified Organization shall publicly post on its website a copy of its prior year’s annual budget, including the total of all funds received from all sources
  • Taxpayers are not allowed to designate or direct their contributions to any particular purpose or for the direct benefit of any particular individual, nor shall they receive any benefit
  • Taxpayers that owns, operates, or is a subsidiary of any entity that contracts directly with a Qualified Organization is not eligible for tax credits
  • Any Qualified Organization that fails to comply with any of the requirements under the Code will be given written notice and have 90 days to comply; failure to correct all deficiencies within 90 days will result in revocation of its status as a Qualified Organization
  • In no event shall the total amount of the tax credit exceed the taxpayer’s income tax liability

PRIVACY POLICY

FosteringSuccessAct.org recognizes the importance of data security and privacy and is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. We assure you that any identifying information we ask you to provide on this website will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

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Through our website, we offer convenient online access to our services and communicate with you about important information. We will not collect personal information from you when you visit our website unless you provide the information to us voluntarily and knowingly. When you make a website inquiry, we ask for your name and contact information. When you make a tax credit application online, we collect your name, contact, and identifying information.

Security
We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure. In order to prevent
unauthorized access or disclosure we have put in place suitable physical, electronic and managerial procedures to safeguard and secure the information we collect online. Email is not recognized as a secure medium of communication. For this reason, we request that you do not send private or sensitive information to us by email. The information you enter on our website is transmitted securely via SSL 128 bit encryption services. Pages utilizing this technology have URLs that start with HTTPS instead of HTTP. We review our data collection, storage and processing practices to ensure we only collect, store and process the personal information needed to administer the program or provide a service. This Privacy Policy applies to data collected on our website only. Our website may contain links to other sites that are not owned or controlled by HEART. Be aware when you leave our website and read the privacy statements pertaining to other sites you may link to.

Contributor Agreement
By making a contribution to a participating HEART hospital, you are agreeing that if your Georgia Department of Revenue approval is obtained, your contribution will be linked to your tax credit application paperwork and will be considered as paid in full for the intended contribution amount. Your payment will not be processed until we have received your DOR approval.

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Georgia HEART Hospital Program, Inc. is committed to accurately processing your tax credit application and payment information. We employ a variety of error checking procedures, and our systems are subject to independent external and internal audits to ensure the privacy and security of your information.

Data Removal Policy
HEART will discontinue contacting any individual upon that individual’s written request. Data will only be stored as long as needed to fulfill legitimate business purposes or for a period of time specifically required or allowed by applicable regulations or laws.

Contact Us
If you have any questions, concerns, or comments about our privacy policy you may contact us using the information below: We reserve the right to make changes to this policy. Any changes to this policy will be posted here.

A Letter to Foster Youth

Helping former foster youth successfully transition into adulthood is the core focus of the Fostering Success Act. Richard L. Jackson, Chairman and CEO of Jackson Healthcare, entered Georgia’s foster care system at the age of 13. He emancipated at 18 years of age.

Here is a letter he wrote to young people aging out of Georgia’s foster care system. As a potential donor, we hope this gives you some insights and understanding into what these young people face.

Dear Aging Out Foster Child,

I am an adult now, but I used to be a foster child.

When you first went into Foster Care, I know that you were very confused, sad, angry, and afraid. Those are normal feelings. Before going further, let me tell you about my experience.

I did not have a father. He left me when I was nine months old. My mother was a nice person but was an alcoholic and could not keep a job. She was incapable and neglected me.

We lived in government housing all around Atlanta. (Most people refer to them as “slums.”) I went to 13 different schools. My family was very abusive to each other, both verbally and physically. It was a terrifying environment.

I was at home for days without my mom and had to provide for myself and go to school by myself. I went into a foster home at age 13 and spent time in three foster homes and an orphanage before I aged out of Foster Care when I was 18 years old.

When I first entered Foster Care, I had these questions – did you?

1.      What did I do wrong?
2.     Why can’t my mom and/or dad take care of me?
3.     Who will take care of me?
4.     What will my future be?
5.     Will I ever be able to go back to my family?
6.     Will anyone ever love me and care about me?

I understand your pain and your uncertainty about your situation and future. Know that those feelings are normal and understandable. Always remember:I understand your pain and your uncertainty about your situation and future. Know that those feelings are normal and understandable.

Always remember:
THIS IS NOT YOUR FAULT!!!! 

You did not choose your circumstances and should not have to go through what you are experiencing now. However, I am here to tell you that you can and will get through it, and things will get better. Our earthly parents may be dysfunctional, flawed, and sometimes can’t take care of us. I understood this at an early age and decided to adopt God as my father because His love is unending and unconditional. He is always there to lift you up during your deepest sorrows.

Remember this:
YOU ARE SOMEBODY! YOU ARE IMPORTANT. GOD LOVES YOU! 

Regardless of your circumstances, you can do something about it and improve your life and future. DON’T LET ANYONE TELL YOU DIFFERENTLY! You CAN break the cycle and make better choices than your family did. You CAN be successful in life. It is not too late, and you are not destined to fail – IF you truly want to make something of yourself.

Adopt this mantra:
IF IT IS TO BE, IT IS UP TO ME! 

When you make this commitment to yourself, then doors can open for you at every level. Choose to be around good people that have good values and are successful in life. Ask them to help you. Many people in life will help you without strings attached if you tell them that you will make the effort to help yourself.

Don’t let people try to convince you that you are a victim and the world is out to put you down. If you will commit to the choices you make – you can be successful in life and identify those opportunities that will allow you to “Rise UP!” No matter what life has dealt you as a child, you can make it.

People told me I would never make it. Parents of other children did not want me to associate with their kids or to date their daughters. Now, I understand that they just didn’t know me. Even when people told me I could not be successful, I chose not to be a “Professional Victim” – blaming others for my circumstances or failures. By taking ownership of who you are, and the choices you make, you are no longer a victim. You are now in CONTROL of your life. I know that this is important, because most of your childhood, you have had no control over your circumstances.

Another thing to remember – you are endowed with seeds of greatness and have been engineered for success by God. The words of encouragement you tell yourself MUST replace the negative words of others. Here are some examples:

  • If you dream it, you can achieve it.
  • If you learn from your failure and commit to changing your course, then it is not a failure.
  • Failure is an event, not a person.
  • Do not associate with negative people that put you down. You need to associate with positive people that believe in you and will help you. Many people will be there for you if you try hard yourself.
  • It is not how you fall down that is important but how you pick yourself up.

In summary, I survived foster care and rose to success, and so can you.

When you determine your definition of success – all you need to do is believe and commit to doing whatever is necessary, make good decisions, and stay focused on your vision. You will succeed.

Here is my last and most important advice,
NEVER, NEVER, NEVER GIVE UP! 

If you will take ownership of your life and commit to do what it takes, then I look forward to seeing you at the top!

Sincerely,
Rick JacksonChairman and CEO,
Jackson HealthcareFoster Care Alumni 1972

QUALIFIED ORGANIZATIONS

The following Foster Child Support Organizations have been certified by the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services to be eligible for the Qualified Foster Child Donation Credit Program for Calendar Year 2023.

  • Bald Ridge Lodge, Inc.
  • Bloom Our Youth, Inc.
  • Broken Shackle Ranch, Inc.
  • Carrie Steele-Pitts Homes, Inc.
  • Chris 180, Inc.
  • Christian City, Inc.
  • Connections Homes, Inc.
  • Elks Aidmore, Inc.
  • FaithBridge Foster Care, Inc.
  • Families 4 Families, Inc.
  • Goshen Valley Foundation, Inc
  • Lydia’s Place, Inc.
  • MAAC (Multi-Agency Alliance for Children)
  • Murphy-Harpst Children’s Center, Inc.
  • North Georgia Angel House, Inc.
  • The Methodist Homes of the South Georgia Conference, Inc.
  • The Orange Duffel Bag Initiative
  • Wellroot Family Services, Inc.

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